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Amd ryzen 5800x vs 3800x

With the new Ryzen 5000 series CPU, AMD challenges Intel to win the coveted title of best gaming CPU. Its main heavyweight product in this battle is the 5900X. However, for most gamers, they are more interested in lower-priced CPUs, such as the next most powerful product in the 5800X series. 3800X is the pre-gen CPU version at the price of Ryzen 7, but it didn't beat Intel's i710700K in single-threaded instructions per clock (IPC), resulting in lower FPS performance for gaming. Let's take a closer look at whether the new 5800X lives up to AMD's ambitious ambitions and is worth spending a bit more than the cheaper older 3800X.

speed 3.8GHz / 4.7GHz

core (thread)

8/16

socket

AM4 TDP

105W

speed 3.9GHz / 4.5GHz

core (thread)

8/16

socket

AM4 TDP

105W

As shown in the figure below, the basic specifications of the 5800X and 3800X are almost the same. The only difference (which may be surprising at first glance) is that the Zen 3 CPU actually has a SingleCore Boost Clock 0.2Ghz lower than Zen 2 and a base clock 0.1Ghz lower, even though All Core Boost is 0.2Ghz higher. More on this below.

"Zen" is the term AMD has used for its different generations of CPU architectures since 2017. The older 3800X is based on the Zen 2 architecture, and the 5800X uses the new Zen 3. Although both the current and previous generations are based on the 7nm process, AMD has greatly improved the technology for Zen 3, increasing energy efficiency, and more importantly, the CPI has increased under the same process size. We can expect that next year’s Zen 4 will have these same improvements, but with a smaller 5nm process. Generally speaking, the smaller the process, the more transistors can be placed, and the more powerful the chip will be.

Most of the performance improvements reported in the new Zen 3 are due to changes to the cache design that AMD has made since the previous generation. Zen 3 processor is not two batches of 16MB L3 memory with four CPU cores in between, but all eight CPU cores can access a large 32MB L3 memory cache. These changes mean that any kernel can now directly access information stored in a single large memory pool (for example, this may be related to the physics of persistent objects in the game world), instead of having to transfer data through the Infinity structure` or cross-kernel Transfer, if it is stored in the other half of the cache. 3900X still divides L3 cache into 2x16MB parts, each part is allocated four cores (8 threads), while 5800X has 1x32MB cache part, and 8 cores (16 threads) are allocated-the total number of cores and memory is the same. Just use it more effectively. In general, this means that Zen 3's processing speed is faster and the game's latency is lower.

is different from the more expensive $350 5950X. The 5950X is aimed at creatives and professionals who need a desktop PC that can handle workstation tasks and play games, while the 5800X and its predecessor, the 3800X, are specifically aimed at gamers. However, on these tasks, you can still get some multi-core productivity from two CPUs. For gamers who don't want to buy dedicated workstation CPUs but get involved in some video and audio editing, Zen 2 and Zen 3 processors outperform the rival Intel CPU i910700K, thanks in part to their high L3 memory cache.

As shown in the figure below, the multi-core performance of the new 5800X Cinebench score is 19% higher than that of the 3800X, and the Corona benchmark rendering time of the new CPU is 20 mm. When comparing the 5800X with the 3800X for workstations, the 5800X definitely stands out.

If you are looking for a suitable workstation machine, we certainly recommend that you look for a 16-core 5950X, or if your budget is limited, please consider using a second-hand 3950X.

Although newer games have begun to use multi-processing capabilities, the main indicator for games is still single-core performance. As we can see, the new 5800X actually has a lower SingleCore speed than the previous 3800X, but in terms of performance, the clock speed is only part of the story. The architectural improvements from Zen 2 to Zen 3 mean that the number of instructions per clock (IPC) of the 5800X is even higher, so the total number of instructions that the CPU can process at any given time is higher. , Or AMD claims.

In the initial disclosure document, AMD stated that the overall performance of the new generation has increased by approximately 19%. Let's take a look at the benchmarks below to see if these claims are confirmed.

is different from the more expensive $350 5950X. The 5950X is aimed at creatives and professionals who need a desktop PC that can handle workstation tasks and play games, while the 5800X and its predecessor, the 3800X, are specifically aimed at gamers. However, on these tasks, you can still get some multi-core productivity from two CPUs. For gamers who don't want to spend money on dedicated workstation CPUs but are involved in video and audio editing, the Zen 2 and Zen 3 processors outperform their Intel CPU i910700K rivals, in part due to their larger memory cache. L3.

As shown in the figure below, the new 5800X's multi-core performance Cinebench score is 19% higher than that of the 3800X, and the new CPU uses the Corona benchmark to represent 20 stars. When comparing 5800X and 3800X for workstations, 5800X definitely came out

It becomes simpler. In this particular case, we really don’t see the second-hand price drop to the point where the 3800X is worth saving, especially when you consider that the 5000 series enhances the future-oriented capabilities of the upcoming controller.

If you already own a 3800X, the question is: Is $449 worth the roughly 25% to 30% increase in FPS performance? Selling your current processor on the second-hand market can certainly reduce the pressure on your wallet. If you are buying a new Radeon 6000 series GPU, the promised performance of smart memory access provided by the new card should increase. The number of frames per dollar. All in all, the 5800X's CPU is much better than its predecessor, and this is one of the times when it is definitely worth buying a new generation.

Speed

3.8 GHz / 4.7 GHz

Core (cable)

8/16

Plug

AM4

TDP

105 W

Speed

3.9 4 4 GHz 4 4 GHz 4 4 GHz 4 4 GHz 4 4 GHz 4 4 GHz 4 GHz plug 4 GHz plug AM4

TDP

105 Watt

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